Death to Snow Days

Are snow days a thing of the past?

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Stella Logsdon

Dowling’s front entrance showing us all winter is here to stay!

Stella Logsdon, Staff Writer/Editor

Close your eyes and imagine waking up in the morning, and you look out the window to see piles of snow laying in your yard. Traditionally, every student’s initial thoughts would surround whether or not school would take place that day. Now open your eyes, to a harsh, harsh reality. Snow days might just be gone for good!

 

Sure, COVID-19 has taken practically everything from us, but this might just be the lowest blow yet. Snow days: we know them, we love them, we lost them? With the pandemic came countless changes to what was previously considered normal for students. A year ago at this time, virtual learning seemed like some sort of weird home school scheme. Now, we’re all too familiar with this method of schooling, which apparently, is coming at a price. 

 

What used to be a beloved aspect of the school year may now just be a thing of the past. Because students and teachers  have the resources to attend school remotely, that’s precisely what happens now. This is met with controversy from students, who either long for the day off, or just smile, nod, and accommodate.

 

Adowek Ajoung (12), shared her perspective on last week’s could-have-been snow day.

 

“To be completely honest, I’m sad that [snow days] aren’t a thing anymore! It’s not so much that I want to go out in the snow, but more that I like to catch up on sleep during snow days. It sucks even more when you’re fully expecting a day off of school, and then its like ‘ha! we’re signing in online!'” Ajoung said.

 

Rachel Heaston (12), a full time in-person student, was honest in her thoughts on the matter.

 

“I think it’s an inconvenience for the teachers, especially those with small children at home. I think it would be best for the teacher’s sake if we didn’t have virtual snow days,” Heaston said.

 

Considerate of her educators, Heaston continued.

 

“As as in-person student, it wasn’t that big of a difference, since I tend to stay home every other day anyways,” Heaston said.

 

Ajoung shared a rather optimistic testament.

 

“Because of the unorthodox nature of the times we’re in, I guess it’s time for a change! As much as I love my sleep, I love seeing my friends, even if it’s online,” Ajoung said.

 

Though the opinions of students differ, it is clear that the possible elimination of snow days is just another adaptation schools are having to make in the face of a health crisis. Hopefully, with the next winter snow comes more answers for hopeful students and teachers!