Dresscode Dilemma

Dowling Students still find a way to show their creativity regardless of their dull school uniforms.

Here+is+a+DCHS+uniform+with+many+different+jewelry+and+necklaces+atop

Mary Kumedjro

Here is a DCHS uniform with many different jewelry and necklaces atop

Most private schools require their students to wear uniforms so they are all identical, but some students adjust and use accessories or footwear to show off their distinctive personalities. Addy Smith (12), Esaba Okwaramoi (11), and Garang Garang (12), all students at DCHS, are great examples of stylish appearance given the circumstance of a uniform.

 

Esaba Okwaramoi (11) displays her beautiful hair accessories in her parti-colored braids. (Mary Kumedjro)

“Because we wear uniforms, we all look the same, so I try to make myself stand out,” Okwaramoi said.

 

Many students believe a variety of things when it comes to explaining why so many students are required to wear uniforms. There are many reasons why school districts rely on uniforms.

 

“I think they make us wear uniforms to practice reverence,” Okwaramoi said.

Addy Smith (12) flaunting new kicks and her rings with her uniform. (Mary Kumedjro)

With all these different ideas, for example, Smith believes that uniforms help you learn better, but Garang believes that they make students feel secure and involved.

 

Their different ideas support the unique ways they flaunt their styles. For example, the way Garang’s hair texture is allows him to do different hairstyles. Okwaramoi wears jewelry in her hair, and Smith shows off rings and bracelets she wears.

 

“My hair, the sway, like, how I present myself . . . it has like a unique feature that no one else has,” Garang said.

Garang Garang (12) parades his uniform and shows off his unique hair texture. (Mary Kumedjro)

 

Objects we wear can become a part of who we are. They can be indicators to point us out to one another. These objects, overtime, can hold an importance to us, and it may remind us of special moments in our lives or opportunities to show our different cultures.

 

“My Mom, she went to Africa when I was like in seventh grade and she came back with like a bunch of colorful jewelry, and so that’s when I started to get really interested in jewelry… I made my own waist beads and jewelry,” Okwaramoi said.

 

“I’m passionate about my rings because I’ve been collecting them for the past two years,” Smith said.