Koppes Counsels

Get to know Colleen Koppes and how she may be able to help you.

Collen+Koppes+standing+infront+of+her+office+posters.+

Molly Dryer

Collen Koppes standing infront of her office posters.

Molly Dryer, Staff Writer

As we all know, the college admissions process is nothing but stressful. For all seniors this year, they make the big decision. Will they even be going to college? If so, where? How much? These questions can be a lot to take on by yourself, but thanks to Colleen Koppes, our lives just got a whole lot easier. 

 

As we said goodbye to Mrs. Gabriel last year, Koppes came into Dowling ready. This role she took on is no small job, but Koppes was more than ready to take it on. With over nine years of work with college admissions, she knew what she was getting into and was ready to help Dowling students.

 

But how does one person take on this huge responsibility? Koppes was happy to talk about her journey, why she chose this job, and how she stays organized.

 

“I didn’t have a great experience with my academic advisor, and they didn’t support me; however, I had a professor that helped support me, and I always knew I didn’t want students to go through what I went through, so I wanted to be there to be that change and impact in a good way,” Koppes said. 

 

Koppes initially wasn’t planning on the admission path, but it wasn’t until her junior year that she decided to make the switch. When she decided to change the direction of her path, it then led her to Minnesota where she got her masters. Which then led to many admission positions in Minnesota.

 

“After going to get my masters, I actually had an internship at Northhead Community College in Brooklyn Park Minnesota. They asked me to stay on for a temporary position in admissions, and it sounded like fun, so I said yes. That really opened the door in starting my career in admissions. Then when I graduated from my masters, I worked at Minnesota State in Mankato for about three and half years. I covered over 100 high schools in the Twin Cities. Then, a job opportunity at Iowa State opened up. I was regionally based in the Twin Cities but could work for ISU helping future Cyclones. I spent 10 years in the Twin Cities, had a family, so that impacted my career path, and I decided to come back home,” Koppes said.

 

Koppes had spent many years working with students on their college journey, with time spent recruiting for colleges, she has worked with thousands of kids each year. While working with so many students, she knew she would need a way to keep organized and efficient. This year was different for Koppes, though. She would be able to work with students more one on one and get to know each of them. 

 

“One thing I do is always plan ahead and making sure i’m organized. I always have a to-do list. I use my Google Calendar on a frequent basis because not only do I work one on one with seniors and their future path, but also I go into classrooms. I do AP testing and the ACT and SAT administration. I feel like if you know things are coming up, if you just prepare ahead of time it is really manageable. Always being aware of deadlines is very important and just having those to-dos,” Koppes said. 

 

Koppes is always happy to meet with her students and get to know them. This is more than just a job for her, she loves getting to know each student and watching them as they begin their journey. To her, this is a job that gives back to her just as much as she puts in.

 

“The most exciting thing is helping guide and counsel students on their next path and where that leads them. Just because it’s such an exciting decision in your young life, and it’s probably the biggest decision you’ll make so far in your life; just to help counsel and support each student through that process is really gratifying,” Koppes said.

 

If you are looking to schedule a meeting with Koppes, no stress, she has it all organized with a quick set up.

 

“A feature that I use is a calendar feature, where students can sign up to meet with me, and it just fits with their availability, my availability, instead of going back and forth,” Koppes said.