You are never too young to be a Prophet

Jeremiah 1:7

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Jenna Lynn BIndel

Religion teacher Kathleen Dautremont teaches a class of sophomores.

Jenna Lynn Bindel, Staff

Religion teacher Kathleen Dautremont teaches a class of sophomores.
Jenna Lynn Bindel
Religion teacher Kathleen Dautremont teaches a class of sophomores.

Many teachers will offer words of encouragement to students at the beginning of the semester. While these words are not necessarily meant to walk with you through life, but rather encourage you to do well in the class or on a specific test, sometimes they do just that.

Some teachers have a speech about making an effort in their class or read their favorite scripture passage. Theology Teacher Kathleen Dautremont likes to read parts of Jeremiah to each new class. Specifically, at the beginning of the year, she reads a verse (Jeremiah 1:7) that simplifies to “never believe you are too young to be a prophet.” While some may find this especially corny, cheesy or cliche words like this are exactly the words that stick with some people through all of their life.

Many of us are familiar with the bible passage where Mary and Joseph lose Jesus when he is about 12 years old and they eventually find him preaching in the synagogue.

Imagine walking into a church or place of worship to find that the new priest the parishioners had so eagerly awaiting was 12 years old. Imagine being told that the savior you and your ancestors had been waiting generations for is just a baby born to a humble unmarried woman.  If most of us walked into a place of worship to find a 12-year-old preaching, we would most likely laugh or leave, or at the very least be extremely confused. So, imagine the reaction of the disciples when they were told that the man they should be following was a man their age from humble roots and not the omnipotent royalty they were expecting.

This week try to look for God in the people you would least expect: turn to friends for homework help rather than immediately turning to teachers, or get coffee with someone you would not usually talk to, all in an attempt to see God in the least likely way.